The Best of CCLaP: “Shining at the Bottom of the Sea,” by Stephen Marche
This week I'm finally reading Neal Stephenson's massive new "Anathem," but that means no new book reviews for awhile; instead I'm reprinting older reviews this week of books I love, for those who may have originally missed them. Today: "Shining at the Bottom of the Sea," Stephen Marche's endlessly clever fake history of a former British island colony that never actually existed. Posted on by Jason Pettus 
The Best of CCLaP: “Jamestown,” by Matthew Sharpe
I'm finally reading Neal Stephenson's massive new "Anathem" this week, but that means no new book reviews for awhile; instead, I'm reprinting a series of older reviews concerning books I love, for those who may have originally missed them. Today, Matthew Sharpe's endlessly witty postmodern take on the Jamestown legend from the early 1600s, simply entitled "Jamestown." Posted on by Jason Pettus 
The Best of CCLaP: “The Possibility of an Island,” by Michel Houellebecq
I'm making my way this week through Neal Stephenson's massive new "Anathem," so won't have new book reviews ready for awhile; I'm instead spending the week reprinting the best of CCLaP's older reviews, for new readers who might have originally missed them. Today: The brilliant but highly offensive "The Possibility of an Island," by celebrated French humanity-hater Michel Houellebecq. Posted on by Jason Pettus 
The Best of CCLaP: “World War Z,” by Max Brooks
I'm reading the thousand-page "Anathem" by Neal Stephenson this week, so won't have new book reviews ready until next week: instead I'm presenting a series of older reviews new readers may have missed. Today: The mind-bogglingly great attack on George Bush and Hurricane Katrina, Max Brooks' "World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War." Posted on by Jason Pettus